100 Dickens Quotes β€” Niche Quotes πŸ’¬ (2024)

We've searched our database for all the quotes and captions related to Dickens. Here they are! All 100 of them:

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There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Never close your lips to those whom you have already opened your heart.

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Charles Dickens

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Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.

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Charles Dickens (Oliver Twist)

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Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

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Charles Dickens

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A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.

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Charles Dickens

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Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. I was better after I had cried, than before--more sorry, more aware of my own ingratitude, more gentle.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.

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Charles Dickens (Our Mutual Friend)

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We need never be ashamed of our tears.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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What greater gift than the love of a cat.

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Charles Dickens

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You have been the last dream of my soul.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.

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Charles Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby)

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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humour.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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I wish you to know that you have been the last dream of my soul.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart.

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Charles Dickens

β€œ

Love her, love her, love her! If she favours you, love her. If she wounds you, love her. If she tears your heart to pieces – and as it gets older and stronger, it will tear deeper – love her, love her, love her!

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Reflect upon your present blessings -- of which every man has many -- not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings)

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Every traveler has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering.

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Charles Dickens

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β€ŽAnd yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that I am, into fire.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.

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Charles Dickens

β€œ

There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world.

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Charles Dickens

β€œ

The broken heart. You think you will die, but you just keep living, day after day after terrible day.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

β€œ

You are in every line I have ever read.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Ask no questions, and you'll be told no lies.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

β€œ

I promise to charm the dickens out of him,' said Will, sitting up and readjusting his crushed hat. 'I shall charm him with such force that when I am done, he will be left lying limply on the ground, trying to remember his own name.''The man's eighty-nine', muttered Jem. 'He may well have the problem anyway.

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Cassandra Clare (Clockwork Prince (The Infernal Devices, #2))

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There is a wisdom of the head, and... there is a wisdom of the heart.

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Charles Dickens (Hard Times)

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No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot.

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Charles Dickens (Our Mutual Friend)

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A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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You are fettered," said Scrooge, trembling. "Tell me why?""I wear the chain I forged in life," replied the Ghost. "I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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Spring is the time of year when it is summer in the sun and winter in the shade.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.

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Charles Dickens (David Copperfield)

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It is because I think so much of warm and sensitive hearts, that I would spare them from being wounded.

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Charles Dickens (Oliver Twist)

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Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.

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Charles Dickens (David Copperfield)

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There is prodigious strength in sorrow and despair.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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A loving heart is the truest wisdom.

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Charles Dickens

β€œ

Think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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No space of regret can make amends for one life's opportunity misused

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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Family not only need to consist of merely those whom we share blood, but also for those whom we'd give blood.

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Charles Dickens

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A man is lucky if he is the first love of a woman. A woman is lucky if she is the last love of a man.

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Charles Dickens

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Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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I am what you designed me to be.I am your blade. You cannot now complain if you also feel the hurt

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child Himself.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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A multitude of people and yet a solitude.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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My advice is, never do to-morrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!

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Charles Dickens (David Copperfield)

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I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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The most important thing in life is to stop saying 'I wish' and start saying 'I will.' Consider nothing impossible, then treat possiblities as probabilities.

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Charles Dickens

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A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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I stole her heart away and put ice in its place.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Every city has a sex and an age which have nothing to do with demography. Rome is feminine. So is Odessa. London is a teenager, an urchin, and in this hasn’t changed since the time of Dickens. Paris, I believe, is a man in his twenties in love with an older woman.

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John Berger

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Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when it comes.

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Charles Dickens (Nicholas Nickleby)

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Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss. I see the lives for which I lay down my life, peaceful, useful, prosperous and happy. I see that I hold a sanctuary in their hearts, and in the hearts of their descendants, generations hence. It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.

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Charles Dickens

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You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of underdone potato. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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Sadly, sadly, the sun rose; it rose upon no sadder sight than the man of good abilities and good emotions, incapable of their directed exercise, incapable of his own help and his own happiness, sensible of the blight on him, and resigning himself to let it eat him away.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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In the little world in which children have their existence, whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Moths, and all sorts of ugly creatures, hover about a lighted candle. Can the candle help it?

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me. But it is the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been. Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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I love your daughter fondly, dearly, disninterestedly, devotedly. If ever there were love in the world, I love her.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop," returned madame; "but don't tell me.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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It is a pleasant world we live in, sir, a very pleasant world. There are bad people in it, Mr. Richard, but if there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

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Charles Dickens (The Old Curiosity Shop)

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We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on. And the mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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Before I go," he said, and paused -- "I may kiss her?"It was remembered afterwards that when he bent down and touched her face with his lips, he murmured some words. The child, who was nearest to him, told them afterwards, and told her grandchildren when she was a handsome old lady, that she heard him say, "A life you love.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I love her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me, than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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And I am bored to death with it. Bored to death with this place, bored to death with my life, bored to death with myself.

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Charles Dickens (Bleak House)

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Never," said my aunt, "be mean in anything; never be false; never be cruel. Avoid those three vices, Trot, and I can always be hopeful of you.

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Charles Dickens (David Copperfield)

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There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose.

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Charles Dickens (David Copperfield)

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Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six , result happiness.Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery

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Charles Dickens (David Copperfield)

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The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fictionβ€”until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define β€œliterature”. The Latin root simply means β€œletters”. Those letters are either deliveredβ€”they connect with an audienceβ€”or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their booksβ€”and thus what they count as literatureβ€”really tells you more about them than it does about the book.

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Brent Weeks

β€œ

Out of my thoughts! You are part of my existence, part of myself. You have been in every line I have ever read, since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then. You have been in every prospect I have ever seen since – on the river, on the sails of the ships, on the marshes, in the clouds, in the light, in the darkness, in the wind, in the woods, in the sea, in the streets. You have been the embodiment of every graceful fancy that my mind has ever become acquainted with. The stones of which the strongest London buildings are made, are not more real, or more impossible to displace with your hands, than your presence and influence have been to me, there and everywhere, and will be. Estella, to the last hour of my life, you cannot choose but remain part of my character, part of the little good in me, part of the evil. But, in this separation I associate you only with the good, and I will faithfully hold you to that always, for you must have done me far more good than harm, let me feel now what sharp distress I may. O God bless you, God forgive you!

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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I'll tell you," said she, in the same hurried passionate whisper, "what real love it. It is blind devotion, unquestioning self-humiliation, utter submission, trust and belief against yourself and against the whole world, giving up your whole heart and soul to the smiter - as I did!

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

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I live in the Managerial Age, in a world of "Admin." The greatest evil is not now done in those sordid "dens of crime" that Dickens loved to paint. It is not done even in concentration camps and labour camps. In those we see its final result. But it is conceived and ordered (moved, seconded, carried, and minuted) in clean, carpeted, warmed and well-lighted offices, by quiet men with white collars and cut fingernails and smooth-shaven cheeks who do not need to raise their voices. Hence, naturally enough, my symbol for Hell is something like the bureaucracy of a police state or the office of a thoroughly nasty business concern."[From the Preface]

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C.S. Lewis (The Screwtape Letters)

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They are Man's and they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance and this girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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Since I knew you, I have been troubled by a remorse that I thought would never reproach me again, and have heard whispers from old voices impelling me upward, that I thought were silent for ever. I have had unformed ideas of striving afresh, beginning anew, shaking off sloth and sensuality, and fighting out the abandoned fight. A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

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There are some upon this earth of yours who lay claim to know us, and who do their deeds of passion, pride, ill-will, hatred, envy, bigotry, and selfishness in our name; who are as strange to us and all our kith and kin, as if they had never lived. Remember that, and charge their doings on themselves, not us.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

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But you were always a good man of business, Jacob,' faltered Scrooge, who now began to apply this to himself.Business!' cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were, all, my business. The deals of my trade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

β€œ

I know this goes without saying, but Stonehenge really was the most incredible accomplishment. It took five hundred men just to pull each sarsen, plus a hundred more to dash around positioning the rollers. Just think about it for a minute. Can you imagine trying to talk six hundred people into helping you drag a fifty-ton stone eighteen miles across the countryside and muscle it into an upright position, and then saying, 'Right, lads! Another twenty like that, plus some lintels and maybe a couple of dozen nice bluestones from Wales, and we can party!' Whoever was the person behind Stonehenge was one dickens of a motivator, I'll tell you that.

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Bill Bryson (Notes from a Small Island)

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For you, and for any dear to you, I would do anything. If my career were of that better kind that there was any opportunity or capacity of sacrifice in it, I would embrace any sacrifice for you and for those dear to you. Try to hold me in your mind, at some quiet times, as ardent and sincere in this one thing. The time will come, the time will not be long in coming, when new ties will be formed about you--ties that will bind you yet more tenderly and strongly to the home you so adorn--the dearest ties that will ever grace and gladden you. O Miss Manette, when the little picture of a happy father's face looks up in yours, when you see your own bright beauty springing up anew at your feet, think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you!

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Charles Dickens (A Tale of Two Cities)

β€œ

The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I love her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me, than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection .

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

β€œ

You are part of my existence, part of myself. You have been in every line I have ever read, since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then. You have been in every prospect I have ever seen since-on the river, on the sails of the ships, on the marshes, in the clouds, in the light, in the darkness, in the wind, in the woods, in the sea, in the streets. You have been the embodiment of every graceful fancy that my mind has ever become acquainted with.

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Charles Dickens (Great Expectations)

β€œ

Old Marley was as dead as a doornail.Mind! I don't mean to say that, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a doornail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a doornail.

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

β€œ

Our opportunities to give of ourselves are indeed limitless, but they are also perishable. There are hearts to gladden. There are kind words to say. There are gifts to be given. There are deeds to be done. There are souls to be saved.As we remember that β€œwhen ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God,” (Mosiah 2:17) we will not find ourselves in the unenviable position of Jacob Marley’s ghost, who spoke to Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens’s immortal "Christmas Carol." Marley spoke sadly of opportunities lost. Said he: 'Not to know that any Christian spirit working kindly in its little sphere, whatever it may be, will find its mortal life too short for its vast means of usefulness. Not to know that no space of regret can make amends for one life’s opportunity misused! Yet such was I! Oh! such was I!'Marley added: 'Why did I walk through crowds of fellow-beings with my eyes turned down, and never raise them to that blessed Star which led the Wise Men to a poor abode? Were there no poor homes to which its light would have conducted me!'Fortunately, as we know, Ebenezer Scrooge changed his life for the better. I love his line, 'I am not the man I was.'Why is Dickens’ "Christmas Carol" so popular? Why is it ever new? I personally feel it is inspired of God. It brings out the best within human nature. It gives hope. It motivates change. We can turn from the paths which would lead us down and, with a song in our hearts, follow a star and walk toward the light. We can quicken our step, bolster our courage, and bask in the sunlight of truth. We can hear more clearly the laughter of little children. We can dry the tear of the weeping. We can comfort the dying by sharing the promise of eternal life. If we lift one weary hand which hangs down, if we bring peace to one struggling soul, if we give as did the Master, we canβ€”by showing the wayβ€”become a guiding star for some lost mariner.

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Thomas S. Monson

β€œ

There are many things from which I might have derived good, by which I have not profited, I dare say,' returned the nephew. 'Christmas among the rest. But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come roundβ€”apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from thatβ€”as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys. And therefore, uncle, though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!

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Charles Dickens (A Christmas Carol)

100 Dickens Quotes β€” Niche Quotes πŸ’¬ (2024)
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